IL Lottery Kicks Off New ‘Carolyn Adams Ticket for the Cure’ Instant Game
Look for the Pink Ticket; Proceeds Support Breast Cancer Research and Education


For Immediate Release Contact: IDPH: Sabrina L. Miller 312-814-8194 (o), 312-519-1974 (m)
Illinois Lottery: Chanele Newton 312-368-5814 (o), 312-618-6174 (m)

 

Chicago, IL—September 12, 2013 — The Illinois Lottery today introduced the 10th edition of its breast cancer awareness instant lottery game, Carolyn Adams Ticket for the Cure, at Loyola University Medical Center, a recent grant recipient of Ticket for the Cure funding. This is the first specialty lottery game of its kind in the United States and remains the only lottery game benefitting breast cancer research.

Since 2006, Ticket for the Cure has raised more than$9.8 million to support breast cancer research, awareness and education in Illinois. Net proceeds from the sale of the ticket are distributed by the Illinois Department of Public Health, which provides grants that fund medical research centers and community organizations across Illinois. The ticket launched today is expected to raise an additional $1 million in funding.

“If I could personally tell every adult in Illinois that we offer an instant ticket that only costs $2, a ticket that, if you lose, funds breast cancer research and programs in our state, and that if you’re lucky could win you $20,000 instantly,” said Illinois Lottery Director Michael Jones, “I think everyone would buy one and we would raise a million dollars easily.”

According to the American Cancer Society, breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women, exceeded only by lung cancer. Death rates from breast cancer have been declining since about 1989, with larger decreases in women younger than 50. These decreases are believed to be the result of earlier detection through screening and increased awareness, as well as improved treatment. At this time there are more than 2.9 million breast cancer survivors in the United States. In Illinois, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) reports that more than 11,000 women in Illinois will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year.

"Early detection is key to surviving breast cancer. If found early, the five-year survival rate is 98 percent, but when detected in later stages that survival rate drops to 26 percent," said IDPH Director Dr. LaMar Hasbrouck. “Funding from the Carolyn Adams Ticket for the Cure lottery game will continue to help researchers develop new treatments and increase the odds of survival when breast cancer is detected in later stages.”

Last year Loyola University researcher Clodia Osipo, PhD, was the recipient of a $200,000 IDPH grant funded by Ticket for the Cure. “The IDPH grant we received is focused on identifying cell-signaling components that predict breast cancer recurrence and, more importantly, provide new gene targets for better therapies,” she said.

Osipo is part of a committed team of Loyola researchers who are focused on improving the outlook for patients with cancer. Last month Loyola broke ground for the University’s Center for Translational Research and Education, a $137 million dollar facility that will accommodate 500 scientists. "Research is a vital part of what we do here -- the important work being funded by this ticket may lead to new treatments that will change the lives of our patients with breast cancer," said Larry M. Goldberg, President and CEO, Loyola University Health System.

This specialty game was renamed Carolyn Adams Ticket for the Cure, under legislation sponsored in 2011 by State Senator Mattie Hunter and signed into law by Governor Pat Quinn. It is named for former Illinois Lottery Superintendent (2003-2007) Carolyn Adams, who lost her battle with breast cancer in 2007 at the age of 44.

Carolyn Adams Ticket for the Cure tickets are currently available at 8200 Lottery retail locations statewide. Each ticket costs $2 and has top prizes (4) of $20,000. For more information visit www.illinoislottery.com and for information about breast cancer and screenings in Illinois visit www.idph.state.il.us/about/womenshealth/factsheets/breastcare.htm and www.cancerscreening.illinois.gov.

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About Illinois Lottery:

Founded in 1974, the Illinois Lottery has contributed $18 billion to the state’s Common School Fund to assist K-12 public schools, as well as hundreds of millions of dollars to the Capital Projects Fund. Players must be at least 18 years old.

About the Illinois Department of Public Health, Office of Women’s Health and Family Services:

Founded in 1974, the Illinois Lottery has contributed $18 billion to the state’s Common School Fund to assist K-12 public schools, as well as hundreds of millions of dollars to the Capital Projects Fund. Players must be at least 18 years old.

About Loyola University Health System:

Founded in 1974, the Illinois Lottery has contributed $18 billion to the state’s Common School Fund to assist K-12 public schools, as well as hundreds of millions of dollars to the Capital Projects Fund. Players must be at least 18 years old.